Meet the CLOE Team!


Dr. Bill Bottke Dr. Bill Bottke, a planetary scientist who specializes in asteroids, comets, meteorites, and the formation of the solar system, leads the CLOE team as the principal investigator for the Southwest Research Institute.  He has undergraduate degrees in physics and astrophysics from the University of Minnesota and a PhD in planetary science from the University of Arizona.  In addition to managing a team of scientist, Dr. Bottke will also help develop the computer models to help us understand the 4.5 billion years of solar system history as revealed on the Moon.  Why is the Moon so important to Dr. Bottke? "Because the Moon may be the only place in easy reach that holds the early history of our entire solar system, how it formed, how things shifted, how things got to be the way they are today."

 

Dr. Amy BarrDr. Amy Barr is a CLOE co-investigator and a senior research scientist at Southwest Research Institute.  She has a bachelor’s degree from the California Institute of Technology and is the Colorado alumni area coordinator for Caltech undergraduate admissions (if you are a high school student with an interest in Caltech, contact her!). She followed her undergraduate work with a master’s degree and Ph.D. from the University of Colorado. She got interested in space and science through her experiences with space camp, the Summer Science Program, and an internship at the SETI Institute.  She is currently on the Board of Trustees of the Summer Science Program. Dr. Barr’s research for the CLOE Team will focus on characterizing the physics happening during the formation of the Moon.  She is very interested in learning how to blow up the Earth … a computer model of it anyway … to help her learn more about making rocky Moons in our solar system.  We recommend that you do not try this at home …

 

Dr. Robin Canup Dr. Robin Canup is a CLOE co-investigator and an institute scientist at the Southwest Research Institute.  She has an undergraduate degree in physics from Duke University and a Ph.D. in astrophysics, planetary, and atmospheric sciences from the University of Colorado.  Dr. Canup has other interests beyond understanding planet and Moon formation; for quite a spell, she was the principal dancer of the Boulder Ballet.  As part of the CLOE Team, Dr. Canup will lead the efforts for understanding the Moon’s formation from a giant impact with the early Earth, including developing computer and mathematical models and analyzing their results. What Dr. Canup likes most about studying the Moon is that it can help us better understand the origin of the Earth and other terrestrial planets.

 

Dr. Clark Chapman Dr. Clark Chapman is the deputy principle investigator of CLOE and a senior scientist at the Southwest Research Institute.  He has a master’s in meteorology and a Ph.D. in planetary science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Dr. Chapman will lead the CLOE team in figuring out the history of impacts on the Moon, and he will help to identify, measure, and count craters on lunar images.  Dr. Chapman became interested in lunar science as a young amateur astronomer and he worked on the University of Arizona's lunar crater catalog after graduating from high school.
During his career, he has specialized in studying asteroids and the craters they make on planetary surfaces.

 

Dr. Luke DonesDr. Luke Dones, a fan of numbers ever since he was a child, is a CLOE co-investigator and a senior research scientist at Southwest Research Institute. Dr. Dones received a bachelor's in physics from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in astronomy from the University of California at Berkeley. The Apollo Program — especially Apollo 8 — got him interested in the Moon. “I was 11 during the Apollo 8 mission. I was excited about how far they were from Earth. The odometer was moving fast!” To Dr. Dones, the Moon is more alien than Mars. His work on the CLOE project will be to calculate the rate of comet and asteroid impacts on the Moon during the last 4.5 billion years.

 

Dr. Erik Hauri Dr. Erik Hauri is a CLOE co-investigator at the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institute.  He is interested in what goes on inside planets from the time they form until … well … now. He is especially curious about the role of water on the evolution of a planet in terms of its internal conditions and geologic activity. He will help the CLOE team study the amount and role of water in the early Moon forming events.

 

Keliann LaConteKeliann LaConte is a CLOE team member at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, where she is a member of the education and public outreach staff. She has a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Denver and a master’s in environmental science and engineering from the California Institute of Technology. Science became her hobby at the age of three, when she learned about fossils while visiting Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument in Colorado. Her fascination with Earth’s ancient history soon led to an interest in other planets, and she is intrigued with how the formation of the Moon may have altered — or made possible — the history of life on Earth. She works to connect diverse audiences with lunar and planetary science through websites, exhibits, hands-on activities for children, and educator trainings.

 

Dr. Hal LevisonDr. Hal Levison is a CLOE co-investigator and an institute scientist at Southwest Research Institute. He has a bachelor’s degree in physics from Franklin and Marshall College and a master’s and Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of Michigan.  Dr. Levison likes to create models that help us understand how planets, Moons, asteroids, and comets have changed and moved around since the solar system formed. Dr. Levison will oversee the CLOE Team's efforts to model the rates of lunar impacts, helping to create the computer models and analyze their results.

 

Dr. Jay MeloshDr. Jay Melosh is a CLOE co-investigator at Purdue University. He has an undergraduate degree in physics from Princeton University and a Ph.D. in physics and geology from the California Institute of Technology. He is interested in impacts and how rocks – perhaps with microorganisms attached — get thrown from their parent planets.  Dr. Melosh will help the CLOE team model the movement of energy and material during the giant impact and later formation of the Moon.

 

Prof. Stephen Mojzsis Prof. Stephen Mojzsis, a CLOE co-investigator at the University of Colorado, Boulder, has a bachelor's and a master’s in geology from Boston University and a Ph.D. in Earth sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Prof. Mojzsis first became interested in science because as a kid he annoyed his friends, family members and teachers with impossible questions about how the universe came to be.  Prof. Mojzsis will help the CLOE team determine the thermal history and timing of impacts on the Moon and Earth by studying ancient zircons and minerals found in the oldest lunar and Earth rocks as well as meteorites from the asteroid belt.

 

Dr. David Nesvorny Dr. David Nesvorný is a CLOE co-investigator and a scientist at the Southwest Research Institute. He thinks the Moon is an interesting place to study because it displays a fascinating record of ancient cratering history.  Dr. Nesvorný will help develop computer models to determine the characteristics of the impactors striking the Moon and the rate of impacts.

 

Dr. Stehanie ShippDr. Stephanie Shipp is a CLOE team member at the Lunar and Planetary Institute. She has a bachelor's in geology from the University of Maine and a Ph.D. in geology and geophysics from Rice University.  She has been interested in science since the ninth grade when her Earth science teacher first told her about plate tectonics. As a member of the education and public outreach team at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, she has the opportunity to help share Earth and planetary science with educators — be they teachers, librarians, or parents. Dr. Shipp will help the CLOE team share their exciting science through several educational programs.

 

Dr. Bill WardDr. Bill Ward is a CLOE co-investigator and an institute scientist at the Southwest Research Institute. He has bachelor's degrees in math and physics from the University of Missouri and a Ph.D. in planetary science from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Ward will help the CLOE team develop models to study the disk of materials around the infant Earth. He’d like to understand how the disk was created by the giant impact and how the rock and vapor of the disk may have formed the Moon.